Winter 2018 Course Listing

The 30 Greatest Orchestral Works, Part II - A18101
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Jane Brown, Instructor
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
Each week Professor Robert Greenberg will tell us about two of the symphonic compositions he feels are among the greatest ever written. The course covers the major periods and styles of Western music from the early 18th century to the mid-20th century. Newcomers to the orchestral repertoire will find the lectures very accessible while seasoned music lovers will find the lectures a worthwhile journey over familiar terrain. Winter term we will learn about works by Tchaikovsky, Smetana, Dvorak, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mahler, Debussy, Stravinsky, Ives, Copland and Shostakovich. The final lecture is “The Ones That Got Away.”
*Jane Brown retired from teaching in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Auburn University. She took piano lessons growing up, played with her high school band, studied early music after taking up the recorder, and currently plays violin with the Auburn University/Community Orchestra.

Advanced Spanish - A18102
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Judy Dekich, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
Text: Flores, A. (1987). Spanish Stories: A Dual Language Book. Dover Publications.
ISBN: 9780486253992.
Join us as we continue the television series El Tiempo Entre Costuras. A period drama based on the novel by María Dueñas, it follows a naïve but gutsy seamstress who is swept away from her Madrid home by romance, civil war, Franco’s regime, and some British spies! The remainder of class time, and some time at home, will be spent reading short stories from the great Spanish classics. 
*Judy Dekich majored in Spanish at Emory University. After getting a second degree in pharmacy and practicing as a registered pharmacist, Judy is teaching Spanish to help others learn this beautiful language.

Beginner Spanish - A18103
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Carmen Hunn, Instructor
Enrollment limited to TWELVE students.
January 22, 29, February 5, 26, and March 5 (five class sessions only).
During the course of study, the students will receive an introduction to the Spanish language and culture. Utilizing their senses, the students will learn through conversations, visuals, games, songs, and a little taste of food from some Latin American countries. Students will make “passports” to “travel” to Spanish-speaking countries. Class participation will earn play money, which may be spent on Dia de Mercado (Market Day) during the last day of class.
*Carmen Hunn taught Spanish in elementary school and for an adult education program after moving to the U.S.

Chinese Culture and Travel: Silk Road Adventures - A18104
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Douglas Coutts and Dong Shang, Instructors
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
January 22, 29, February 5, and 12 (four class sessions only).
The Silk Road was the global internet of its day - For the first part of the course (weeks one and two) Prof. Coutts will present and discuss various historical aspects of the Silk Road including the emergence of Buddhism, spread of Christianity, first use of currency, links with the West and the role of Marco Polo.  Learn about Chinese culture, including history, geography, ethnic minorities, religions, festivals, arts, food, and practical travel tips regarding shopping, transportation, eating, and other things. Discover China’s top attractions: the Great Wall, Forbidden City, Yangtze River, Terra Cotta Warriors and Horses, and the cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Guilin, and Xi’an as well as Sichuan Province, Silk Road, and Tibet.
*Douglas Coutts has over 35 years of experience working in international development programs and humanitarian relief operations around the world including stints with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Select Committee on Hunger, the U.S. Congress, and the U.N. World Food Hunger Program. His last posting for the past three years was in Africa as U.N. Resident Coordinator in the Comoros Islands. He is an occasional guest lecturer and speaker at Auburn University.
*Dong Shang is a native of China and has a degree in art. An art designer, she immigrated to the United States, where she has worked as a freelance artist and an art teacher.

Chinese Brush Painting - A18105
Monday, 12:00 – 1:55 pm
Sunny Slope
Dong Shang, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
$70 fee, payable to Dong, for the purchase of a Chinese painting kit that includes rice paper, three brushes, ink, and Chinese water colors.
This hands-on course is an introduction to Chinese brush painting and calligraphy. Chinese painting attempts to capture the essence of nature. It is the art of using suggestion and simplicity to imply reality. The sense of harmony that pervades Chinese culture is expressed in the traditional subjects of flowers, animals, and landscapes. Learn the basic brush strokes, composition, and spontaneous-style painting techniques.
*Dong Shang is a native of China and has a degree in art. An art designer, she immigrated to the United States, where she has worked as a freelance artist and an art teacher.

The Classical World: Alexander the Great, The Hellenistic World, and The Roman Republic - A18106
Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Joseph Kicklighter, Instructor
In the winter class, we will be describing the rise of the empire of Alexander the Great and the spread of the Hellenistic world. It is my intention that we consider the accomplishments of Hellenistic civilization and its limitations as well. The course will conclude with the rise of the Roman Republic and its relations with the Hellenistic world as well as the much closer and influential Etruscan one. Mythology and patriotic history will be utilized to explain Rome’s origins and early evolution as we move forward to explore the development of Rome’s republic and its problems and accomplishments. My intention is to reach the first century BCE at the end of this term.
*Joseph Kicklighter earned a PhD in medieval Anglo-French history at Emory University and taught English history at Auburn University. He was an instructor in the Alabama at Oxford Program, where he had the opportunity to instruct students in England and to participate in tours of significant historical sites.

Contemporary American Short Stories - A18107
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Bert Hitchcock and Margaret Kouidis, Instructors
Text: Oates, J.C. and Beha, C.R. (2008). The Ecco Anthology of Contemporary American Short Fiction. New York, NY: Harper Collins. ISBN: 9780061661587.
As subtitle for Contemporary American Short Stories we appropriate Oates’s phrase “unsettling short fiction.” The thirteen stories selected address the challenges of American life, sometimes with humor, often with acute exploration of our darker thoughts and experiences, always with imaginative energy.  The result is fresh narratives and amazingly good writing.  For our first meeting, class members are encouraged to read two brief short stories: Lydia Davis, “Television,” and Amy Hempel, “To Those of You Who Missed Your Connecting Flights Out of O’Hare.” Typically two stories will be assigned for each class.
*Bert Hitchcock and Margaret Kouidis, both longtime faculty members in the Department of English at Auburn, co-edited multiple editions of the nationally-published textbook anthology American Short Stories.

Culinary Creations: Cooking with Ursula
Wednesday and Thursday, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
503 Sanders Street, Auburn
Ursula Higgins, Instructor
Enrollment limited to seven students.
$15 fee per class, non-refundable, payable to Ursula.
Respected culinary expert Ursula Higgins presents a series of cooking classes. Each week features two hands-on classes with the same menu. Students will eat their culinary creations. If you have dietary restrictions, please contact Ursula. If a student registers for a culinary course and then is unable to attend, he or she is responsible for finding an OLLI academic member to fill the opening.
Register for each individual class by using the day’s course number.
Winter Soups and Stews
Wednesday, January 24 - A18108
Thursday, January 25 - A18109
Winter Salads to Pair with the Winter Soups
Wednesday, January 31 - A18110
Thursday, February 1 - A18111
Pastas from Scratch
Wednesday, February 7 - A18112
Thursday, February 8 - A18113
Tortillas and Fillings
Wednesday, February 28 - A18114
Thursday, March 1 - A18115

 

Cultural Immersion - Ghana - A18116
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Pebble Hill
Elizabeth I. Essamuah-Quansah, Instructor
This course is a continuation of the overview of the country Ghana in West Africa. The class will focus on the following topics: Ghanaian language; family life; arts, literature and music; the art of cooking Ghanaian food (cooking lesson); leisure and tourism (attention on current opportunities for tourism and investment); Ghanaian architecture (housing); interchange between Ghana and other African countries; and the oil industry and its associated issues.
*Dr. Elizabeth I. Essamuah-Quansah is a Ghanaian-American who currently serves as the Coordinator for AU Outreach Global. She earned her BBA from Ghana, her MBA from Indiana University and her PhD from Auburn University. She has several years of work experiences in Ghana and the U.S. academia, industry, and NGOs, including serving as West Africa Coordinator for Africa Global Ministries.

The Early History of the Christian Church: From the Apostles to Gregory the Great - A18117
Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
Ben Jefferies, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty-five students.
How did a movement that began with twelve people in Palestine develop and spread across the Mediterranean and the wider world, becoming the Church as we know it today, with its two billion adherents? How did the early church organize itself? What theology was developed early on and why? How did the Bible come about? What did it mean to be a member of the Church in those first tumultuous centuries? These and similar questions will be examined through a study of primary source documents in this historical survey.
*Ben Jefferies received an M.Div in 2014, with a heavy emphasis on historical theology. He serves now as an Anglican priest in Opelika. Having grown up in the Baptist Church, it was an introduction to Christian church history that led him to embrace the riches of tradition in his present vocation.

Economics and Data: Making Sense of Media and Political Messaging – A18118
Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Kristine Anderson, Instructor
Enrollment limited to TWENTY students.
Do the mixed messages of politicians and the media about the economy leave you a little puzzled? This course will provide an overview of economics and investigate ways that data and statistics are misused. You will explore areas such as the difference between fiscal and monetary policy, unemployment, trade, and taxes through the lens of economics. We will look at the causes of the Great Depression and the Great Recession. This course will use a variety of materials including selected Great Courses videos by Professor Timothy Taylor of Macalester College.
*Kristine Anderson serves as manager of state-wide education finance data projects. A native of Minnesota, she moved to Alabama in 2014. Kristine received a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration and a Master of Business Administration degree at the University of Northwestern - St. Paul.

The First Amendment - A18119
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Steven Brown, Instructor
Ever since the November 2016 presidential election, and perhaps without realizing it, Americans have engaged in a remarkable and spirited discussion about the First Amendment.  In just over twelve months, we have debated the freedoms of association and assembly that accompany Antifa protests and counterprotests; the freedom of press in both its traditional role and forms and more modern applications like the Internet and social media; the freedom of speech associated with Richard Spencer at Auburn and white supremacists in Charlottesville; and, of course, religion, as expressed in, among other things, Supreme Court rulings upholding governmental support to religious schools.  The course examines the First Amendment, its protections as envisioned by the Founders, highlights of the constitutional case law associated with it since the 1920s, and the practical impact of the Supreme Court’s First Amendment jurisprudence on America today. 
*Steven P. Brown received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia and has taught at Auburn since 1998. He teaches courses in American Constitutional Law, Religion and Politics, Law and Society, and Introduction to American Government. His research focuses primarily on church and state issues and American legal history. He is currently working on a traveling exhibit about landmark Supreme Court cases from Alabama, which will tour throughout the state during the 2019 bicentennial of Alabama statehood. 

Geological History and Geomorphology of Alabama - A18120
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Pebble Hill
Michael Mason, Instructor
The course will present the geological history of Alabama from the Precambrian to the present. There will be special interest paid to plate tectonics, great extinctions, climate variations, and the evolution of Alabama landforms.
*Michael Mason is a retired army engineer officer and author, artist, and musician. He holds an MS in geophysics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a BS in geology from Old Dominion University. He is a formally trained meteorological observer. Prior to his retirement, he was a registered professional geologist in Alabama and Tennessee and a Certified Environmental Specialist.

Intermediate Spanish - A18121
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Judy Dekich, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
Join us Winter Term as we continue the mystery/drama, El Diario de Ernesto Madero. This is an audio in slow Spanish with an interactive transcript. In the grammar section, we will do an interesting variety of practice activities on the command form. Finally, conversation in pairs will be facilitated by prompts. Weekly topics will be assigned in advance.
*Judy Dekich majored in Spanish at Emory University. After getting a second degree in pharmacy and practicing as a registered pharmacist, Judy is teaching Spanish to help others learn this beautiful language.

Introduction to Social Media - A18122
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Xi Lin, Instructor
Too old for social media? Don’t let anyone tell you that because it’s not possible! Survey after survey reflects more seniors are participating in social media. They are jumping on board Facebook, Twitter, and more as they realize it is fun and provides real benefits. Therefore, this course will take you to explore different social media and how to use them.
*As a scholar, Xi Lin’s research focuses on adult learners motivations for using educational technology. Xi is a digital native who will take you to explore the world of social media.

Keeping Secrets: Spies and Other Strangers - A18123
Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Camille Carr, Instructor
Enrollment limited to fifteen students.
Text: Furst, A. (2013). Mission to Paris: A Novel. New York, Random House.
ISBN: 9780812981827.
Who’s keeping secrets and who can you trust? This session will be peering into the captivating genre of the spy novel. We’ll find out how our characters got caught up in this world of intrigue, secrecy, and deception.
*After serving as a teacher, principal, writing consultant, and reading coach, Camille Carr wants to continue to inspire others to read, read, read. Spy novels are a favorite genre of hers that she sees as sparking that interest.

Learning Spanish: How to Understand and Speak a New Language, Part 2 - A18124
Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Sylvia Cooke, Instructor
Text: Learning Spanish workbook. (Students who took Part I of this course should already have the workbook.)
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
Winter 2018 term is Part 2 of 4. This Great Courses class features Bill Worden, PhD. He has over twenty
years’ experience as an award-winning professor of Spanish. Spanish is the official language of over twenty countries. This introductory course blends exercises, vocabulary building, and basic grammar.
*Sylvia Cooke is retired after 32 years as a Spanish teacher, twenty of which were at Auburn High School. She taught all levels of Spanish from beginning speakers through preparation for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate examinations.

The Life and Work of Mark Twain, Part I - A18125
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Pebble Hill
Jim Rogers, Instructor
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
His name was Samuel Clemens, but America knew him by his pen-name, Mark Twain! From the late 1800s into the early years of the 20th century, Mark Twain wrote his way into the fabric of America and became our nation’s first true celebrity! In this course you’ll meet Mark Twain and understand how and why!
*Through college and my career as a radio and TV newsman and commentator, I attempted to reach the heights achieved by Mark Twain. I didn’t, but my appreciation continues!

Lifelong Learning Begins with Play: Respecting the Value of Play in Adult Living and Enjoying Play with the Children We Love – A18126
Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
Sean Durham, Instructor
Enrollment limited to FIFTEEN students.
January 29, February 12, 26 (three class sessions only).
This course will review research about the importance of play throughout the lifespan and provide practical suggestions about how to engage in playful activities alone, with peers, and with young children. Participants will also have the opportunity to see a multimedia presentation about a play-based early education program offered each summer at Auburn University. The session will conclude with a time for participants to play with loose parts and other materials in order to explore the creative and rewarding dimensions of play for themselves.
*Dr. Sean Durham is an assistant professor in Curriculum and Teaching at Auburn University. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in early childhood education. His research interests include children’s social and moral development and how play promotes positive cognitive outcomes in children and adults.

Line Dancing - A18127
Monday, 10:30 – 11:30 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Betsy Keown, Instructor
Enrollment limited to thirty students.
Line dancing class for beginners and experienced dancers, done to a variety of musics - everything from Glenn Miller to Willie Nelson, Charlie Daniels, Little Big Town and many more. Not only is it fun, but great exercise for the body as well as the mind. Wear comfortable shoes, preferable, not rubber-soled, and bring a water bottle.
*Betsy Keown has been line dancing twice weekly for nine years and teaching for the past four. She loves the exercise and the joy of performing at nursing homes and other venues.

Painting for the Novice, Session 1 - A18128
Thursday, 10:15 am – 12:05 pm
Sunny Slope
John Rhoden, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
Note: Two painting class sessions are offered this term. Students may register for one session.
Materials required: palette knives (2), a fan brush and a liner brush, 16x20 canvas, acrylic paint set or titanium white, cadmium yellow (medium hue), ultramarine blue, burnt umber, and sap green acrylic paints.
Using acrylic paint, students will learn to mix basic colors, perspective techniques, and how to hold and use the palette knife. Students will then paint a 16x20 acrylic landscape following step-by-step demonstrations of techniques by the instructor. The finished painting should be one you will proudly display.
*John Rhoden is a retired teacher who has lived in Europe and trained with local artists. He has painted many landscapes, winning numerous awards.        

 

 

Painting for the Novice, Session 2 - A18129
Thursday, 12:20 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
John Rhoden, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
Note: Two painting class sessions are offered this term. Students may register for one session.
Materials required: palette knives (2), a fan brush and a liner brush, 16x20 canvas, acrylic paint set or titanium white, cadmium yellow (medium hue), ultramarine blue, burnt umber, and sap green acrylic paints.
Using acrylic paint, students will learn to mix basic colors, perspective techniques, and how to hold and use the palette knife. Students will then paint a 16x20 acrylic landscape following step-by-step demonstrations of techniques by the instructor. The finished painting should be one you will proudly display.
*John Rhoden is a retired teacher who has lived in Europe and trained with local artists. He has painted many landscapes, winning numerous awards.        

Poetry Writing: Stimulus, Sense, and Sound - A18130
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Pebble Hill
Ken Autrey, Instructor
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Text: Lockward, D. (2013). The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop. Nicholasville, KY: Wind Publications.
ISBN: 9781936138623.
OR
Lockward, D. (2016). The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop. West Caldwell, NJ: Terrapin Books.
ISBN: 9780996987127.
This class will address strategies for writing and revising poems. We’ll experiment with various types of free and formal verse. The class will discuss sample poems, spend time writing each week, and occasionally look at drafts that class members choose to circulate. All writers are welcome; you need not be an accomplished poet to benefit from the pleasures of poetry. The recommended textbook should not be confused with The Crafty Poet II, edited by the same author.
*For many years, Ken Autrey taught poetry workshops at Francis Marion University in South Carolina. He has published three poetry chapbooks, and his work has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. He has taught Poetry Writing four times previously for OLLI.

Practicing Public Deliberation - A18131
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Mark Wilson, Instructor
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Are you interested in discussing difficult public issues with other OLLI members? The practice of public deliberation is where democracy thrives, and the search for a shared direction on issues that are divisive is the hard work of citizenship. We’ll talk through tough issues--public education, faith and public life, the opioid crisis, race relations--facilitated by a neutral moderator and using non-partisan issue guides published by National Issues Forums.
*Dr. Mark Wilson directs the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities and teaches an undergraduate course in community and civic engagement. Wilson serves on the board of directors of National Issues Forums.

Rivers of Alabama - A18132
Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Bill Deutsch, Instructor
This course will cover the human and natural history of rivers in Alabama. Topics include the origin of the river map on the Alabama Great Seal; river geography, geology and hydrology; the state’s world-class aquatic biodiversity; the role of rivers in human settlement, economy and culture; river politics and policies; and personalizing your river ethic. Participants are encouraged to share their river stories and to discuss all topics in relaxed and enjoyable ways. Field trips to rivers and museums are possible.
*Dr. Bill Deutsch is a Research Fellow, Emeritus in the School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences at Auburn University. He has worked as an aquatic ecologist and educator around rivers for forty years. He co-founded the Alabama Water Watch program for promoting citizen volunteer water monitoring, environmental education, and improved water policies.

The Rust Belt - A18133
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
Ed Hornig, Instructor
Enrollment limited to sixteen students.
Text: Campbell. B.J. (2009). American Salvage: Stories. New York: W.W. Norton. ISBN: 9780393339192.
Author Bonnie Jo Campbell writes about the lives of people that globalization has left behind...people coping with diminishing opportunities, drugs, struggling children, divorce, and all that our industrial decline has brought to areas that once prospered.
*Ed Hornig came to Auburn in 1990 as pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church. He pastored the church until 2008, when he retired. He and his wife Sandra now reside in Auburn.

Seated Tai Chi for Arthritis - A18134
Monday, 12:45 – 1:25 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to fourteen students.
February 5, 12, 19, 26, and March 5 (five class sessions only).
Seated Tai Chi, adapted from Dr. Paul Lam’s Tai Chi for Arthritis, was designed to enhance flexibility, muscle tone, and fitness. It incorporates the essential principles of Tai Chi with an emphasis on breathing, posture, and space awareness, with the added benefit of stress reduction. Other exercises found to be beneficial for those with arthritis will be included.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

Slavery and East Alabama - A18135
Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Keith Hebert, Instructor
Text: Carey, A. G. (2011). Sold Down the River: Slavery in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley of Alabama and Georgia. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.
ISBN: 9780817317416.
This course examines the history of slavery in East Alabama from the late 18th century through emancipation. While slavery was central to East Alabama society, its history has been largely ignored or misrepresented in public memory. This course will examine slavery among Creek Indians, internal slave trade, master-slave relations, regional economy, slave resistance, slave culture, emancipation, and more.
*Keith Hebert, PhD, is Assistant Professor of History at Auburn University. His interests in slavery stem from what he was not told about the history of his northwest Georgia community.

Staying Active – Basics of Day Hiking - A18136
Thursday, 12:30 – 3:30 pm
Sunny Slope
Harold Bruner, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
The cooler winter temperatures are a perfect time to hike in Alabama! This course is aimed at those who have some hiking experience and are moderately fit. Each session will begin with a classroom topic of 30 minutes or so followed by a local area hike of 2-5 miles. All hikes will be at a leisurely pace with an emphasis on an interpretive aspect. Explore topics such as safety, navigation, online resources, and planning a hike in an area you’ve never visited.
*Harold is a retired forester who now hikes for fitness and pleasure. He has hiked in Cuba, Alaska, California, Florida, the desert southwest, and most recently in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire. Having spent more than 60 years in Indiana and Florida, he is enjoying the biodiverse landscape of Alabama.

Strategies and Insight for Management of Hearing Loss in 2018 - A18137
Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Marsha Kluesing, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, and 28 (six class sessions only).
Our connections to our world and to each other are enhanced by the function of all sensory inputs. This course provides information about the importance of maintaining our health and how this can affect our hearing sensitivity, balance function, and tinnitus, which can occur gradually over time. Understanding these changes and learning to cope with them can enhance our quality of life.
*Marsha Kluesing is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University. She holds the doctorate of audiology degree from the University of Florida and Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association.

Taiji Qigong: Moving Meditation - A18138
Monday, 1:30 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
February 5, 12, 19, 26, and March 5 (five class sessions only).
Taiji Qigong was designed as a deeply relaxing body-mind experience. Composed of several sets, each with unique purposes that are easy to learn and with regular practice can replenish energy, improve health, and help prevent illness. Several variations of Taiji walking will also be introduced. Participants must be able to be up and moving for 45 minutes.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

Tell Me A Story - A18139
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Gibbs Couch, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
Learn how to craft an original story for telling and how to transform a written story into an oral story, and get suggestions for telling a story. The majority of class time will be allotted to giving participants opportunities to tell stories and get feedback on how to improve their stories.
*Gibbs Couch has always enjoyed a good story. Sometimes the stories are true. She enjoys telling stories but likes hearing one even more. She has taught many storytelling and theatre classes.

A Visual Guide to the Universe, Part II, and Earth’s Changing Climate - A18140
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Charlotte Ward, Instructor
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
For the first time in human history, we can see the full splendor and mystery of the universe, thanks to instruments on scores of planetary probes and observatories that have been launched into space since the 1990s. From Saturn’s rings to the heart of the Milky Way, and from colliding galaxies to cataclysmic gamma-ray bursts at the edges of visible space, some of the most spectacular sights in the cosmos are now as easy to see as the stars above. Many of these cosmic phenomena occur at wavelengths of light that are beyond the range of human vision and can only be detected by special instruments in space.
*Charlotte Ward, associate professor emerita, physics, has sought for many years to make science accessible to interested people with little background in science.

Walk This Way: Couch to Walking 5K - A18141
Thursday, 8:30 – 9:30 am
Meet at the Toomer’s Oaks
Bob Banks, Instructor
Join us for this seven-week program designed to assist you in developing a walking exercise program. Students will meet at Toomer’s Corner by the oaks each Thursday to learn about the benefits of walking. This course is open to novice and veteran walkers.
*Bob Banks is an avid runner. A retired insurance professional, Bob concluded his career with Alfa Insurance.

What Has Happened to Sports and Why,
Part I - A18142
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Jim Barber, Instructor
There are many examples of questionable practices in different sports that we will watch (via videos), review (printed material on the internet), research (from various forms of media), discuss, and hopefully partially resolve these questions. This is an investigatory course! Bring your passion, your pride, favorite sports bias, anxiety medication, and join the fun or fight.
*Jim is a recently retired construction engineer/contractor with four score and a dozen years of experience that are cheerfully and thankfully in the past. He is working on his advanced degree in geezerhood, and specifically, serial napping and advanced grumpiness.

Wildlife Photography - A18143
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
David Peterson, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
This course features Tim Laman, a National Geographic photographer. He will show us how he copes with all sorts of conditions to capture award-winning images of cranes, fish, orangutans, tigers, frogs, and the stunningly beautiful birds of paradise. Even if you aren’t keenly interested in photography but love wildlife, you should enjoy this class. Tim Laman is a contributing photographer for National Geographic. He is also a research associate in ornithology at Harvard University’s Museum of Comparative Zoology and a fellow with the International League of Conservation Photographers.
*David Peterson has been taking pictures and had an interest in photography for over sixty years.

Winter Mysteries - A18144
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Julie Strong, Instructor
Enrollment limited to fifteen students.
Texts: Cleeves, A. (2017). The Crow Trap. New York: Monotaur Books.
ISBN: 9781250122742.
Burke, J.L. (2014). Cimarron Rose: A Bill Bob Holland Novel. New York: Pocket Books.
ISBN: 9781476782560.
French, T. (2008). In the Woods. London: Penguin Books.
ISBN: 9780143113492.
The quality of a mystery novel often depends on the character and demeanor of the detective in charge of solving the crime. In the three mysteries of this term, this is particularly true.
*Julie Strong has a BA in English and comparative literature from Columbia University. She holds a MEd degree in early childhood education and a master’s degree in gifted and talented education. A retired teacher, she facilitates book clubs.

World War I: The Great War, Part II - A18145
Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum
Ned Dendy, Sue Mason, and John Parr, Instructors
This is a Great Courses DVD course.
They thought it would be a quick and easy war--in and out, over and done, home by Christmas. Never in their wildest imaginations did they know it would shape world history in such a way. Never did they think that over ten million people from thirty countries would die in a war that would last over four years, or, that one million would be wounded--a generation of people. The idea that their governments would totally collapse was preposterous. Post-war genocide and Spanish flu would wreak further destruction.
*Sue Mason holds degrees in education and geography. She has taught K-8 and DoD cartography, terrain analysis, GIS, and instructor training. She lived eight years in Europe and has traveled extensively.
*Ned Dendy graduated from Auburn University in aerospace engineering. He worked with NASA, with commercial aviation manufacturing, and with the United States Army Missile Defense Systems.
*John Parr served in the U.S. Navy for 22 years. After retiring from the Navy, John became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Evansville. Education: BS Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1969; MS Electrical Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, 1974; PhD Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1988.

Writing Our Lives - A18146
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Pebble Hill
Terry Ley and Cathy Buckhalt, Instructors
Enrollment limited to FIFTY students.
Text: Bragg, R. (2015). My Southern Journey: True Stories from the Heart of the South.
New York, NY: Oxmoor House.
ISBN: 9780848746391.
“Our Lives are like a patchwork quilt, and it is only in the evening of life that we can see the pattern of what we have woven.” (Richard L. Morgan, Saving Our Stories: A Legacy We Leave) We all have life stories to tell! Here is an opportunity to reclaim your memories, write about them, and share them with a receptive audience of peers. We will write each Monday morning, responding to stimulus prompts provided by the instructor. Recommended homework: finishing and revising what you have begun in class and reading self-selected memoirs, biographies, and autobiographies.
*Terry Ley taught high school English in Iowa before coming to Auburn University, where he was a professor of English education. He has taught Writing Our Lives each OLLI term for twelve years.
*Cathy Buckhalt is a retired teacher from Opelika Middle School and Southern Union State Community College. She also was associate director of the Sun Belt Writing Project for many years.

Yoga for the Rest of Us - A18147
Monday, 9:00 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Tammy Hollis, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty-five students.
This course is for anyone who has practiced yoga. All levels are welcome. The focus is on stretching, movement, and balance, all interwoven with breathing techniques. Bring your mat and towel to support your knees or back, and wear comfortable clothing as we continue our yoga journey together.
*Tammy Hollis is certified by the American Council on Exercise Group Fitness. She also has certifications for YogaFit and Silver Sneakers. Currently, Tammy serves as an instructor for  Yin Yoga for the City of Auburn for its 50+ program, for  Yin Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex, for Silver Sneakers Circuit and Classic Classes, and for Silver Sneakers and Gentle Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex.

 

 

 

Last Updated: December 13, 2017